Irises in The Knot Garden

Those irises are blooming now in the Knot Garden in Fulham Palace, South West London. The beautiful wisteria framing the garden is thought to date back to the 19th century. It was a bright sunny day and I am planning to come again in the early evening when the light is a bit softer. The irises are the main feature now but the other flowers will follow soon. As I read on the Palace website the planting colour scheme is blue, red and yellow so hopefully I be able to show you what is blooming next.

iri4iri3iri2iri5iri1ir9iri9ir2irr1ir3ir5ir7

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20 thoughts on “Irises in The Knot Garden

  1. I particularly like the wisteria, draping beautifully in the background. Brings back memories of the wisteria my grandmother had on her front fence when I was a child. 🙂

      1. mind you, I forgot all about the scent! my husband pointed out the delicious scent of the irises I’ve planted at the back of the house, just violet ones but their scent is delightful and subtle

  2. Irises are so wonderfully flamboyant, aren’t they? A few are appearing in local gardens here but they look fabulous displayed together like this. I lived in London many years ago but don’t know this area at all. Thanks for sharing. (and have a great trip ‘home’) 🙂

  3. The Wikipedia article about wisteria has this to say about its name:

    The botanist Thomas Nuttall said he named the genus Wisteria in memory of Dr. Caspar Wistar (1761–1818). Questioned about the spelling later, Nuttall said it was for “euphony,” but his biographer speculated that it may have something to do with Nuttall’s friend Charles Jones Wister, Sr., of Grumblethorpe, the grandson of the merchant John Wister. (Some Philadelphia sources state that the plant is named after Wister.) As the spelling is apparently deliberate, there is no justification for changing the genus name under the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature. However, some spell the plant’s common name “wistaria”, and Fowler is decisively for the “wistaria” spelling.

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